there's a widely held belief about the development of software that goes something like this: the goal is software that works, regardless of intuitiveness or aesthetics, and developers put aside all else with that goal in mind.

This is a misconception: the user experience matters, the user must understand and be able to easily use software, and the software must look and feel "right" despite what's under the hood. And unfortunately, there are still developers who live by the old mentality, making the most minimum goal – basic functionality – the cornerstone of their development philosophy.


Function is Not Enough

LegacyX doesn't seek to meet minimum functionality. We aim much higher, with an emphasis on expert data migration, client needs, and user interface, not just to out-do that basic goal, but to raise the bar overall.

It's about bringing great software to the people, and elevating them to where they're in full command of that software.

It's not enough for software to just work; it has to look and feel as amazing as it runs. It's not enough to just jot down users' most barebones requests; software must meet and exceed user needs while simultaneously raising user understanding and efficiency to a higher level. It's not enough to just plug legacy data into new software and hope for the best; developers must do legacy data migration right, which includes having data migration experts on hand and part of any project.

It's about bringing great software to the people, and elevating them to where they're in full command of that software. An ambitious mindset, to be sure, but LegacyX arms itself with a proven development framework that prioritizes transparency, feedback, and results: Scrum.

The Scrum Process and User Inclusion

In use since the 1990s, and documented extensively at www.scrumalliance.org, the Scrum process eschews traditional, function-first-beyond-all-else development for a much more involved and results-driven framework. LegacyX implements this framework within the context of user inclusion, a governing idea that says user concerns must be included and addressed at every step.

It begins with "stories." LegacyX first looks at legacy software and gathers user needs and wants into a narrative called, simply, a "story." Stories are then studied in-depth and prioritized, which determines which stories are to be addressed in the next "sprint."

User needs must not only be met, but in a way that helps the user become better at using their software.

A sprint is a short development cycle lasting less than one month (LegacyX prefers two week sprints). During the sprint, developers plan how to best meet the requirements set out by each story, create tasks, work on said tasks, incorporate new and modified code into new software builds, test new builds for quality and to minimize bugs, and document new features and changes.

LegacyX develops while thinking about the user, without exception. When legacy components are updated, new functionality created, or legacy data ported over, we always ask, "How will this benefit and empower the user?" Both in the software and its accompanying documentation, user needs must not only be met, but in a way that helps the user become better at using their software.

At the end of the sprint, a new software build is created (an "increment") and demonstrated to users. Feedback is gathered; new stories are created from new requirements and prioritized accordingly. From here, the process begins again in a new sprint.

Proven Benefits

The process of gathering stories and breaking down large tasks into manageable and easily understandable sprints has proven benefits for everyone. The appropriate users are included in the development process, as is required for any meaningful attempt to update legacy software. Developers have clear goals and deadlines, as well as a solid plan in using sprints to make even the most seemingly overwhelming goal reachable. Our clients agree, and we think you will too, that the Scrum method is superior to traditional methods of software development. Doubly so when updating legacy software, made even more effective with a focus on user inclusion.